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Excellent Play-by-Play Analysis of the Texas O and D

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The concisely-named shaggybevo.com poster "P" recently published a damning analyses of our offense against OU. His conclusion: our offensive woes result from a combination of jaw-droppingly poor play design, inscrutable play selection and frustrating failed execution. In other words, Greg Davis provides a veritable cornucopia of fail.

I encourage you to read through the entire thread, as P has separate posts for each play he documents and his analysis is excellent. But, here is one of my favorites just to give you a sample of what to expect:

Here is another "winner" by GD.

We are gonna run the counter play that we popped the TD with Monroe on. GD decides to "outsmart" the defense by running it to the short side of the field. There is no room to execute that play on the short side of the field the way we run it. Couple that with the fact that we decide to put the strong side of the formation over there as well, and you see why we failed.

We line up with twins right and a TE on the edge, meaning OU will shift the strength of their defense to that side, as any good D would do. This is what dooms this play from the start.

As the play develops, you see Monroe would have a chance if the boundary wasn't so close. There is just nowhere to go. There are too many bodies on that side of the field to turn it up, and the sideline is coming up fast.

As you can see Monroe is forced to the sideline, and has to try to get what he can. That play might have a chance if either of two things happen.

1) We run the play to the wide side of the field.

2) We put the strength of our formation on the wide side, and run the counter to the shortside. As it stands the play was doomed from the beginning!

P also provided a companion analysis of our defensive lapses against OU. The evidence here points more towards execution problems than schematic flaws. As you might expect, our melanin-deficient starting safety figures heavily in the analysis.