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Is Myck Kabongo NBA Bound?


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Jonathan Tjarks turns his attention to Myck Kabongo in the latest installment of his college-to-NBA scouting takes.

NBA Draft Toolbox: Le'Bryan Nash, Myck Kabongo Among Big 12 Prospects Building Cases



Neither Kabongo nor Nash was particularly impressive to start the season, but they've both rebounded in Big 12 play as their teams' jury-rigged rotations began to coalesce. Now they are faced with an incredibly difficult decision: cash in on their recruiting pedigree and potential to be late first-round picks or stay another year in school for a chance to be a lottery pick in 2013.


Neither Kabongo nor Nash was particularly impressive to start the season, but they've both rebounded in Big 12 play as their teams' jury-rigged rotations began to coalesce. Now they are faced with an incredibly difficult decision: cash in on their recruiting pedigree and potential to be late first-round picks or stay another year in school for a chance to be a lottery pick in 2013.

Kabongo, an extremely athletic 6'1, 170-pound point guard with a 6'7 wingspan, is averaging 10.4 points, 3.1 rebounds and 5.1 assists as a freshman. As a prospect, he's the most well-rounded PG in the country, a lightning-quick true point with long arms and an improving outside shot.

However, he still commits far too many turnovers (3.1 a game) and needs to improve his offensive efficiency from the floor (42 percent this season). Realistically, he's at least one year away from being a reliable NBA contributor.

Most college basketball analysts would say it's a no-brainer for him to come back to school, but that's easy to say when you aren't the one looking at a guaranteed $3-4 million and a potential lifetime of financial security. There's no predicting the future: after an inconsistent freshman year at Memphis, Dajuan Wagner was selected No. 6 overall in the 2003 NBA Draft. Two years later, he was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis, effectively ending his basketball career.

Even if a player avoids the injury bug, there's no guarantee NBA scouts won't fall out of love with his game the longer he stays in school. An underclassman with holes in his game is a a half-full cup with untapped potential; an upperclassman with holes in his game is a half-empty cup who may not be able to make the transition to the next level.

Be excellent to each other.

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